Frank's Place - Home
The List of Movies Spoiled
New to the List
Say it with Film
Must See Movies
Movies to Avoid
My Oscar Picks
My Rating Key
MPAA Ratings
Wanna Spoil One?
Request a Spoiler
Found an Error?
About this Site
Site FAQs
Other Movie Sites
Email me, Rosebud

Counter

Spoiled Movie Endings

Frequently Asked Questions

Okay, actually none of these questions have ever been asked, but I think that's because we've already answered them. But if you find you still have a question, knock yourself out and ask by emailing me.

Using the Site... About Films... About Us...

Q: Why spoil movies?
A: Why not? If you're here, you're either bored, curious, or looking for spoilers. We're here to help.

Back to Top

 

Q: Do you work alone?
A: No duck is an island, so no, I don't work alone. There's a team of three humans and myself working on the Films project, a few other humanoids who officially contribute to the site, as well as those totally awesome site visitors who send in spoiled endings.

Back to Top

 

Q: Where do you get the endings?
A: From the films themselves. Between the three people on the team, and the other periodic contributors, we have about 2,500 movie titles on video tape and DVD. Plus, we go to the movies a lot. When that all fails, we have a nifty Netflix subscription that keeps us up to our wing-pits in films, five titles at a time.

Back to Top

 

Q: How often do you go to the movies?
A: At least once a week, but if there are lots of movies out, we'll just hang out all afternoon at the theater, and a group of us will watch 'em all.

Back to Top

 

Q: Isn't spending all day at the theatre expensive?
A: Not really, all things considered. We only go to matinee shows (with rare exception), and $6.50 for a movie isn't a bad deal... it's cheaper than renting the movie, and if you figure the movie is two hours, you've just gotten entertainment cheaper than Disneyland, Chuck E. Cheese or a date (even a bad date).

Back to Top

 

Q: How do I get involved if I want to join the spoiled movie team?
A: Let me know you're interested. Honestly, the more folks helping keeping this going, the easier it for everyone involved. After all, if it were just me, with national and limited (aka artsy-fartsy) release films, I'd be in the theatres watching between six and 12 movies a week. Very time consuming.

So, if you go to the movies already, don't mind writing a brief summary of what happens at the end and sharing it with us, let me know and we'll talk turkey (or whatever meal-time bird you prefer). We don't have an official spoiler team t-shirt (yet), but there are Frank Staff shirts I hand out to my crew (XL only, in red), and I'd be happy to pass one along if you're on board with being part of the gang.

Back to Top

 

Q: I'm studying the history of movie ratings. What came before the MPAA?
A:
Prior to 1960, when the Motion Picture Association of America began rating films, there was a privately-formed group handling the decision of what was good, moral, and appropriate. The major movie studios came up with a standard of decency that would become a de-facto standard from the early 1930s until MPAA's rating system won as the law of the land.

  • For my short version of it all, you can read my summary of it without going to the library.
  • If you need a history of the formation of the MPAA, try here, and
  • If you want to read the Hays Code, it's here.

Back to Top

 

Q: Can you help me with the whole Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon thing?
A: No, but this site can. Put in the name of the person you're trying to link to Kevin Bacon, and in a matter of seconds, you'll have the answer -- it's way cool. Maintained by the University of Virginia, they also have a place where you can link any actor or actress to any other -- check it out!

Back to Top

 

Q: What's with the IMDb link on your pages?
A:
Our thinking is, if you're curious about the film, you may want to read more about it (reviews, comments, see who was in it, that sort of thing). We use the Internet Movie Database -- IMDb -- as our source of information, and since we're saving the movie details in our database, it seems only fair to share the direct link to the IMDb page about the film with you.

Back to Top

 

Q: Okay, so what's with the IMDb link to Carmencita?
A: You caught us. There are rare times where a film isn't listed by IMDb. This is typically either a made-for-TV movie that somehow slipped past the IMDb folks, or maybe it was a film we caught at a local film festival. (Them film festival flicks are sometimes produced and shown in one area only, and again, fly under the IMDb radar.) Since the link has to go somewhere, when we have no other IMDb reference point, we share with you the first movie in the IMDb database.

Carmencita, as a film, was a one-minute short, silent film shot in 1894, and as near as anyone can determine, was the first American-made movie, and Carmencita was the first person to set foot before a camera and show her stuff (she was a dancer).

Back to Top

 

Q: How do I find a foreign film title?
A:
The Search feature will get you there. As a rule, we will list the English equivilent film title on the Titles list (the groupings by the title's first letter). The foreign names are displayed as an "aka" -- also know as -- but are not cross-listed under the foreign title. If the film does not have an English name (rare, but possible), or did not have one at the time it was added to the database, it will be listed by the foreign title only.

Back to Top

 

 

 

Spoiled Movie Endings Main Page | Home | About Me | Legal Disclaimer     © All Rights Reserved, allaboutfrank.com